Gotland – not as we planned it

My mum loved the unique nature and birdlife in Gotland and this was planned as a family excursion for her, Christopher and myself.

Christopher has a keen interest in medieval history and Gotland has plenty of historical sites. In addition, I have an aunt with vast local historical knowledge living in Visby, so this would make for the perfect family excursion. At least that was the plan prior to mum’s cancer diagnosis. For a long time we hoped our planned trip could go ahead, but when time draw closer, we realised that she wouldn’t be able to come with us. She was still keen for us – and especially for Christopher who had never been there – to go and explore the island and have a good time.

Gotland can be very touristy during the high season, but we were given excellent recommendations by my aunt Siv. On her suggestion, we rode stretch of road in the south captured in the video below, arriving along the coast at Hoburgsgubben, a rock formation which, with some imagination, can be interpreted as a man, or perhaps a troll. We decided to video the journey, so we could show mum upon our return, and here it is now for everyone to enjoy:

In addition to this video, we took lots of photographs for mum, thinking that we at least could share our experience with her. Fortunately, we had time to show them to her before she passed away. As they were intended for mum, the main focus is nature, flowers and birds.

This is Snäck, north of Visby. We stopped and enjoy an evening picknick here the first evening on the island.
This is Snäck, north of Visby. We stopped and enjoyed an evening picnic here the first evening on the island.
Sunset at Snäck.
Sunset at Snäck.
Up at the most northern tip of Fårö.
Up at the most northern tip of Fårö.
Familly of birds, no doubt they have a name and mum would have known it.
Familly of birds, no doubt they have a name and mum would have known it.
Seagull captured in flight.
Seagull captured in flight.
Wagtail coming in for landing.
Wagtail coming in for landing.
Visby is known for its old houses and roses.
Visby is known for its old houses and roses.
The city of roses.
The city of roses.
Old town of Visby, the city of roses, and other flowers too.
Old town of Visby, the city of roses, and other flowers too.
The great wall of Visby, my aunt and I.
The great wall of Visby, my aunt and I.
Flowers in the botanical garden.
Flowers in the botanical garden.
Forget me not (I think) and butterflies.
Forget me not (I think) and butterflies.
A flower among more flowers.
A flower among more flowers.
Mum would have known.
Mum would have known.
Botanical garden and me.
Botanical garden and me.
West coast with a view of Stora Karlsö.
West coast with a view of Stora Karlsö.
Assorted birds.
Assorted birds.
The southern tip of Gotland and Hoburgsgubben. Someone had painted the nose green. There is an interesting myth about this stone formation, google it if you're curious.
The southern tip of Gotland and Hoburgsgubben. Someone had painted the nose green. There is an interesting myth about this stone formation, google it if you’re curious.
Roses!
Roses!
We love cats and so did mum!
We love cats and so did mum!
The smallest of all the small houses in Visby. I'm posing purely for scale.
The smallest of all the small houses in Visby. I’m posing purely for scale.
Raukar, they are limestone formations created by wind and water over time.
Raukar, they are limestone formations created by wind and water over time.
Raukar and me, at Fårö.
Raukar and me, at Fårö.
A ship grave, again I'm in the photo for scale.
A ship grave, again I’m in the photo for scale.
Tornerspel at Lojstad ruin, all the knights are sponsored by local businesses. The first knight is Eskel av bröderaskapet sponsored by Eskelund's bakery following him is Tvenne pilar sponsored by the ferry company Destination Gotland.
Tornerspel at Lojstad ruin, all the knights are sponsored by local businesses. The first knight is Eskel av bröderaskapet sponsored by Eskelund’s bakery following him is Tvenne pilar sponsored by the ferry company Destination Gotland.

Global Friendship

We don’t have one language in common, instead we speak three languages in between the three of us, Japanese, English and Spanish, as we take shelter in a local Spanish restaurant in Gracia. I had wanted to show my international friends the area in Barcelona where I used to live, before moving to Calafell. My plan for this evening included our normally pleasant weather – not a steady downpour. But the food is excellent and the company better still, despite some occasional confusion when we speak the wrong language to the wrong recipient. The bartender is amused by our group and absolutely thrilled when he learns that Selma is originally from Argentina and they even have a common home town. He brings us strawberry gazpacho to celebrate this. Selma orders Argentinian meat, Sono is excited by the idea of Spanish tapas and we share three little plates followed by three rather large cakes for desert. It’s been a busy week for them, when you come from Japan to spend a week in Catalunya then you must make the most of it. They have been riding in the Pyrenees together with Sue from WIMA GB and, in addition, managed to see some of what Barcelona has to offer in the culture department: Gaudi’s architecture and Picasso’s art. To complete the list, we managed some shopping for Spanish goods before dinner.

Dinner in three languages. photo Courtesy Selma Rosa Perez
Dinner in three languages. Photo Courtesy Selma Roza Peres

On my behalf, it’s been a couple of eventful weeks, moving houses, starting a new teaching position and in the midst of it all my WIMA friends from England and Japan basically arrived on my doorstep. Sue had rented a house up in the Pyrenees and I joined her for some amazing riding. We were lucky to be recommended a brilliant route by fellow bikers. It was 200 kilometres filled with twists and turns, it kept us busy until evening in fact, with various coffee and photo stops along the route. We started off in Col de Nargo and headed to Berga along route L-401, in the morning the road was quiet, but we soon met lots and lots of bikers, it was evident that the road was popular and we could see groups of bikers on different viewpoints along the route, as well as bikes passing us when we stopped for photos. Our return route took us up north approx. 20k and then back through the villages Saldes, Gosol, Tuixent and Sorribes. This road was not accepted by my GPS, possibly because some of the roads were tiny – my TomTom app does that sometimes, it overrules my choice of road. A small part of the route was on gravel, which reminded me that my bike isn’t suitable for gravel and I had better stay off it. Well, there are smooth gravel roads like the one to my parents’ house in Sweden (which is a piece of cake to ride), and this looked like that to begin with, but soon got loose and my road tyres were sliding. Arriving on tarmac made me both praise civilisation and wish I had a smaller, lighter bike with offroad tyres so I could do it all again. I can definitely see myself on a smaller bike in the future.

Sue and I in the Pyrinees. Photo Courtesy Sue Barnes
Sue and I in the Pyrinees. Photo Courtesy Sue Barnes

After the weekend, while I had to return to work, Sue was expecting our Japanese friends for a few days riding. However, our planned ride out to meet them as part of my return had to be drastically changed due to some very expected events. While lifting my very sleepy head to check the time early Monday morning (public holiday here so I wasn’t going to go to work anyway) I found out that it was 4:30am. I also found out that Sono had ended up on Mallorca instead of Barcelona and that Selma, who had arrived in Barcelona on a different flight, had been pickpocketed and lost all her money. They were on a tight schedule, since Japanese people hardly ever get more than a week off work consecutively, and their hire bikes were waiting for them. The decision was easy, I would await sunrise and head down from the mountains and try to help. I’m spoiled, being used to a completely different work culture. I would personally never even consider flying to another continent during a week’s holiday, but they must make do. I absolutely admire their ability to make the most of it and I would do whatever I could to make things easier for them.
So, I met with Selma and we tried to locate the rental place. Firstly, I feared that the place didn’t exist and that their booking offer was fraudulent. Luckily, it turned out that the company had not announced that they had moved place and changed phone number and we did track them down in the end. When we finally arrived, and explained Sono’s predicament, the owner kindly offered to keep the place open until 4pm. I had already offered Sono to take my bike up to the Pyrenees if she wouldn’t make it, but since her booking couldn’t be cancelled we were still hoping she would be able to make it – and she did – literally in the last minute her taxi arrived. I was very happy to contribute to making their arrival in Barcelona a little less stressful and be able to escort them out of Barcelona and on their way up to the Pyrenees, no doubt they were tired after their long flight to Europe and their respective mishaps, and I wanted them to have a smooth start to their riding at least.

While they enjoyed the mountains, I returned to work. We had scheduled to meet up again on Friday, Sono’s last day in Europe and in the restaurant in Gracia we closed the circle. Selma’s flight was a couple of days later so we made plans for the weekend – we learned that we both have a passion for books so we spent Saturday morning in bookshops. I was amazed to learn that she was named after a Swedish author, Selma Lagerlöf and I secretly sought out a Spanish edition of one of her books as a present. Selma, the author, is native to my region in Sweden and her house Mårbacka is now an impressive museum and celebration of the author’s life. She was also the first woman to receive the Nobel Prize for Literature. Not a bad character to be named after, I must say!

Dream dinner by the sea, Barcelona harbour. Photo Courtesy Selma Rosa Perez
Dream dinner by the sea, Barcelona harbour. Photo Courtesy Selma Rosa Perez

Since Selma had dreamed about having dinner next to the sea, we had to make this happen for Saturday night, and then we did the same for Sunday lunch but here in Calafell. I was happy to welcome her as my fist visitor to my village and we were both quite surprised as we stumbled upon a local charity ride in support of children with Dravet Syndrome here in Calafell harbour, “Rolling for Kids”, it was called. We had an interesting chat with the organisers and showed our support before continuing our Sunday stroll along the beach, our feet in the water and the sun in our faces. We shared a typical Spanish three course Sunday lunch before Selma had to return to Barcelona.
Supporting local charity ride "Rodando por los niños"" in Calafell by buying their cool T-shirt. Photo Courtesy Selma Rosa
Supporting local charity ride “Rodando por los niños”” in Calafell by buying their cool T-shirt. Photo Courtesy Selma Rosa

Later the same day, while reflecting on the recent events during my evening tea on my balcony, I felt a sincere happiness to be part of WIMA. There are a lot of barriers and discord in the world, that is for sure, but I’ve had the time of my life together with people I wouldn’t have met without WIMA – considering the four of us come from four different countries and three different continents – to me this is amazing networking and great WIMA spirit.

When your brain threatens to explode – what better to do than go camping?

Life is busy: too much work, not enough work – no job offers vs. too many possibilities. Paperwork that needs to be done, deadlines that need to be met and and a pile of e-mails that need replying to. This combined with a backache, a cold and flatmates that disturb my sleep made life unbearable. That is when I love to take the bike out, go camping, disconnect from everything, not check my e-mails, not FB, not talk to anyone just breathe and exist. An opportunity to get some solid sleep, see some new views and just enjoy life knowing that no one can claim my time because in this moment, my time is mine.

I love camping - Christopher loves me, and I love him even more for coming along.
I love camping – Christopher loves me, and I love him even more for coming along.

Despite the weather forecast we could enjoy a beautiful sunset and, later on, when the forecast came true, some heavy rain and thunderstorms – but we were already tucked away in our sleeping bags by then. The following day, when returning to Barcelona the long way, we had some rain while riding some amazing roads, but not until after we cooked our roadside lunch. When all expenses are translated into teaching hours, all costs needs to be cut.

Roadside lunch - mashed potato and beans - Chritopher is keeping his helmet on due to midges, a fobia that don't go well with camping.
Roadside lunch – mashed potato and baked beans – Christopher is keeping his helmet on due to midges, a phobia that doesn’t go well with camping.

As a welcome surprise, we found ourselves in a bar showing the MotoGP when stopping for afternoon coffee in the small village Avinyó. This completed our already very enjoyable weekend.